Requesting content via Iridium Sats

A thought I have had for a while now was an easy method to request content when you are using Outernet in remote locations. I wondered about using the Iridium sats to relay a request/feedback. Looks like it could be do-able if you grab up some credit and set up a TX like this:

That module is a bit pricey but could be an option should someone need it. As they get a bit more common now that Spark-Fun is promoting them, the price might come down a bit. Just a thought I figured I would share.

Cheers
Eric

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Yes. This is very interesting. :smile:

Link is just for reference, not for promoting the product :slight_smile:

take a look here nice video about iridium :smiley:

rock block its just amazing !!!
but to expesive

pd: fisrt video of presentacion in ccc december last year https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCf5JFpOkDs

http://www.rock7mobile.com/products-rockblock

from this page:

It’s not just the cost of the module, then you need to put the rest of the terminal together (CPU, memory, storage, enclosure, power, etc). That’s $250 for just the module. And $8/month so that you can pay 10-cents for every 50-bytes of data that is transmitted. I believe that works out to $2,000 (two thousand) per MB.

That’s true :smile:

Okay…

I thought Outernet was looking to have Twitter requests for content etc. This would be a quite small chunk of data. I could be wrong but last I checked a msg was 128 bytes roughly. So at your math I could request content from Outernet for about a quarter per information needed (plus the cost of the receiver).

“then you need to put the rest of the terminal together (CPU, memory, storage, enclosure, power, etc)”- Hmm I pay under 3 bucks for a Nano with Atmega 328 which talks serial just fine…

It is a bit odd that a CEO would immediately retort a complimentary technology (not competition). Not the first time I have seen this in the forum though.

I would be interested in the options from Outernet on sending communication back without cell/net connection at this time.

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I didn’t mean for it to come off as a negative comment, but it clearly did. The size of the RockBlock is really neat–and it is definitely the only transceiver that works everywhere in the world–right now. The second generation of our L-band terminal will be a little bit higher in price (~$300), so I am being critical of both that product and our own, as I really want a sub-$100 product. Unfortunately, we can’t get there just yet (though we are actively working on this).

Our plans for sending messages back out to satellite are based on geostationary L-band. To make requests for content, we won’t be charging people. These will of course be very simply messages and must take place within the Outernet messaging system, but it will be free.

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I wonder if one couldn’t create a high latency low bandwidth mesh network using AX.25 Amateur Packet-Radio Link-Layer Protocol via a Raspberry PI powered TNC, and maybe making use of a FidoNet like messaging system rather than a routing protocol - this would enable requests for content to be sent to a single satellite uplink, or distant ground based connection - I appreciate that this would necessitate local cooperation amongst users, however it could also radically reduce the costs involved in creating a two way system.

What an excellent idea. I would love to participate in any way I can. I am a Ametuer and am thinking about attempting to communicate with AX.25 Amateur Packet-Radio Link-Layer Protocol via a Raspberry PI powered TNC via overhead satellites I think the Raspberry Pi is amazing. I have just ordered a $15 Orange PI which may offer some fun Amateur radio experimentation.

George KW4QB

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What an excellent idea. Amateur satellites offer an excellent opportunity to send info. I would love to participate in any way I can. I am a Ametuer and am thinking about attempting to communicate with AX.25 Amateur Packet-Radio Link-Layer Protocol via a Raspberry PI powered TNC via overhead satellites I think the Raspberry Pi is amazing. I have just ordered a $15 Orange PI which may offer some fun Amateur radio experimentation.

George KW4QB

Seasalt, I also think that would be a good idea. Request via the APRS network. Or even better, since you can send emails via slower mediums such as APRS, Winlink, LoRa, SMS, etc. Setup an email address where you send a request and the files are sent out to the outernet stream.

It will add a little bi-directional functionality to the outernet.

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We are happy to include an APRS feed.

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Syed that sounds like a great idea.

Have you got any info on how you would do it?

In theory it would be possible to send up a APRS message addressed to myself using VHF-UHF radio to one of the Amatuer APRS Satellites or even the International Space station (If it is working APRS) and have them send it to earth and then Outernet could then send the APRS message back to me.

That would be really groovy.

The problem with APRS that the user base would limited only to licenced ham radio users :disappointed:

LoRa, Sigfox however sounds like a good idea as licence free bands!

APRS on outernet is receive only on outernet receiver so no ham license required. Hams however can use external software YAAC to pull data and TX

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The lowest level Ham License will, I believe let you send VHF APRS messages up to the FREE of Cost APRS Amsat satellites and the International space station.

The Amateur Ham guys have done an enormous amount of work in Building these amateur satellite receivers in space. The only thing they ask of any one wanting to use their system, is that you pass a simple test. So that you know how to use this equipment correctly.

Right now the APRS messaging is a 100 % global coverage messaging system that is available to all amateur radio users. There is no other system like it.

I think it is really awesome that Outernet are adding a satellite receive capability to the already amazing APRS network.

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