Outernet for sailors (weather forecast grib files)


#81

Why Ocaenia as a “test” market or is there a more dedicated reason?

What satellite power output will you use in Europe and Oceania.


#82

A friend of mine works at Kymeta here in the Seattle Area. He posted this picture on his Facebook. It’s an electronically steered Ku antenna on the test truck. It had me drooling in envy.

–Konrad


#83

Does it work? What is Data rate?

Can you drive on winding roads and still have a K-band connection. (assuming K Band )

What is the business case for this Antenna.

is it $30,000, $10,000, $2,000 or the wholly grail of Low Earth Orbit satellite constellations $200.00 a unit.

Compared to My old Outernet L-Band antenna it is huge.


#84

Any update on Oceania Othernet coverage?


#85

The antenna uses meta-material technology to electronically steer a beam at a Ku band satellite. It can be circular or horizontally polarized. It’s primary intent is satellite TV right now.

I don’t know what the data rate is.

Yes, you can drive on winding roads, watch satellite TV on a small sailboat, or on a train, etc.

I believe this video and article will tell you Kymeta’s business case:

Kymeta wins a big OK from FCC and U.K. for satellite connectivity in a pizza box

I have no idea how much their pizza box costs. I think they will probably replace the ugly domes on RVs, dishes on homes, etc. I’m sure that like flat screen TVs, the prices of the dish will come down.

Yes, compared to the patch antenna, it’s huge. But your patch antenna was not able to receive TV. I’m sure a much smaller version could be developed for data broadcasting applications like Outernet.

–Konrad


#86

Kymeta reports successful sea trials for antennas; gears up for broadband service

–Konrad


#87

I know the researcher is currently testing out in Vanuatu, but I don’t know the results of his latest testing.


#88

The pizza box shown in geekwire link is a pretty big vsat. Gotta remember it would be transmit and receive


#89

What satellite are you using for testing and does it cover Philippines?

I would be happy to test.


#90

Is it a receive only?

Or is it two way K band data.

Either way receiving K Band Television whilst driving is impressive.


#91

The one on top of their white Toyota Rav-4 SUV is a two-way transceiver for Ku band data. I believe the Ford truck here is yet another demo vehicle, same two-way Ku band antenna.

I can see a real application for rural police, surveillance, emergency rescue vehicles, etc. to have two-way data.

From the videos, it also looks like there are simple receive-only dish replacements coming.

Yes, right now it looks like they are addressing the early-adopters market where they are spend $$$. Rest assured, this technology will be cost-reduced soon.

–Konrad


#92

It’s IS-18 Ku, which is a bit east of you.


#93

Can some one tell me what the dBW will be for the philippines. Is it enough to get the new Othernet 3 KU working?


#94

No argument this is the Coolest thing. And in a way possibly the most exciting thing to happen to Antennas in the last 10 years.

I agree price will drop as they are basically LCD TV screens made into a Antenna.

What is the current price for one Flat antenna?


#95

As of last year, it looks like they were $15,000 a piece.


#96

Yup, as expensive as a flat screen TV when they first came out. No surprise.
–K


#97

SpaceX intend to put up 1000 LEO mini KU band satillites in the next two to 3 years and have flat electronically steered antennas for the ground station.

The magic number would need in my humble opinion to be $200 per Kymeta antenna.

I just cannot see that happening, In the next 2 to 3 years.

Plus in 2- to 3 years the entire populated section of the planet will be very much covered by some form of 5G mobile data service.

A $40 phone with 5G will be able to do 1 MB sec data versus a car top Antenna that might cost $200;

But for Boats and Planes, Military and VERY VERY Remote travel SpaceX and Kymeta antennas will have a Market.


#98

SpaceX’s Starlink will drive down the cost of flat antennas fairly quickly as production volumes are created.

5G won’t work except in the densest part of cities. The path losses at 24GHz are far too high for 5G to be cost effective even in suburbia. I’m still very skeptical about 5G.

–Konrad