Uses of the bitcoin blockchain


#1

If the Outernet is going to hold the bitcoin blockchain, what will it be used for? (Since, of course, you need two-way internet for bitcoin to be transferred from person to person)

Do you have any near-future plans for uses of the bitcoin blockchain on the Outernet, or is this more something that you see becoming useful when your ultimate goal of free two-way internet around the globe is realized?


#2

There are no plans of cashing in the bitcoin donations anytime soon (if that’s what you were asking). The absolute best-case scenario was if we could raise enough bitcoin to create an endowment for Outernet, thereby guaranteeing operations indefinitely.


#3

No I mean how are you going to use the actual blockchain data? It says on the homepage of outernet.is that “Bitcoin blockchains” will be held in the Outernet. It’s under “What Will Outernet Deliver?”. Will it be held there just for a reference purpose – so anyone can observe all the past transactions on the blockchain? Or will it be more than that?


#4

look here: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=334701.0


#5

Now I understand, sorry about that. It would only be a blockchain broadcaster, like a ticker tape. And that, like any of the content decisions, is not set in stone just yet. All content will be decided with input from the community.

Do you have any specific ideas regarding bitcoin broadcasting?


#6

Nothing in particular.


#7

Nice. Thanks for sharing that link. Donated here too.


#8

I just figured, that it doesn’t even state the one reason i thought might be important. Some kind of dDoS attack:


#9

I must say, security is my FIRST and foremost concern and I was hoping that this could grow into a massive operation for a free and open internet that is crowd-funded by the world and its independent organizations. I count Bitcoin as leaning towards more security and freedom. Hopefully Outernet can do the same.


#10

Please help us realize that vision. Spread the word and offer any suggestions and feedback that comes to mind.


#11

Bitcoin is a very asymetric system with regard to data thoughput. Broadcasting the blockchain would reduce the bandwidth consumption of users who had metered or limited Internet connections would greatly improve the practial market reach of the Bitcoin economy.


#12

This is an incredible project! I was contemplating the idea that internet content would be headed to private, paid satellite networks but Outernet is much broader in scope. I’m currently conducting a year-long investigation into Bitcoin, so developments here at Outernet will be closely watched.

I look forward to more!

GK


#13

Um, why so long? Anything about Bitcoin that I can’t tell you, I know who to direct the question towards.


#14

Its actually a one-year qualitative research project into Bitcoin. These types of intensive studies are usually conducted over an extended period of time. I’m taking more of a subjective approach, diving into all aspects of the Bitcoin experience, from selling my own creative works for Bitcoin to mining to participating in all levels of Bitcoin commerce.


#15

If it’s experience you seek, I could probably answer any questions myself. I’ve been involved since a bitcoin was worth 6 cents.


#16

Thank you for your offer of assistance. If I have any questions, I know who to field them to.


#17

Were you mining when it was worth $.06? If so, wow.


#18

No, I’ve never mined. I bought at 6 cents each. Of course, I spent most of those long before $1, so I’m far from rich, but I paid for an entire year of cell phone service using only about $1 of that first batch, so I literally cannot lose now if the price went to zero.


#19

The goals set are impressive indeed.

Have a concern/query: Since the Bitcoin network requires to update every few seconds to update transactions; will the Outernet provide fast enough data turnover and throughput to ensure the blockchain remains constant and real-time?

I may have a knowledge-gap on this.


#20

The bitcoin protocol discribes a type of client called a “light client” that does not require constant Internet access, and uses a reduced trust security model. While the light clients do need occasional access to the Internet, regular updates of blocks from Outernet would suffice for most functions.